[12]

Dogware (Zapac, Hungary) 3:40

Track 12

Luck + Death: home page — Amazon — Kobo

Gat’s assignment in Luck + Death is to protect a washed up superstar named Max Prince, who’s recently been the target of an attempted murder. Prince’s estate has all the latest security and then some.

Dogware is a military system that shouldn’t even be in private hands, consisting of large, implacable robot sentries that—for reasons of psychological effect—have been styled in the general shape of dogs. The system’s designers found that a fear of dog attacks was virtually universal, irrespective of personal experience.

Max has the Dogs, but they’ve been compromised. When his attacker entered the grounds of the estate, they not only failed to stop him, they turned on each other, attacking one another in an orgy of mutual destruction while the assassin simply walked into the house.

This track isn’t what I imagined at first as music for the Dogs—it has too much of a sense of humor—but once I heard it I knew it was the one and only choice. The sproingy, mad energy of this song is simply perfect for the insane attack of Dog on Dog.

The Dogs in this fictional system bear a family resemblance to robotic systems being developed by Boston Dynamics for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

You can find more about the real-life counterparts to Dogware on this part of the Luck + Death home page, but for the moment, take a look at Cheetah, below, a legged military robot prototype that has surpassed the speed record by Usain Bolt, the fastest human.

You seriously do not want this chasing you.

____________________

Credits:

Dogware was originally released as Test Drive by Zapac, which can be found here. It was released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License. (Zapac / CC BY-NC 3.0)

The photograph by lavocado@sbcglobal.net shows Chinatown in Los Angeles and was released under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License. It can be found here. I cropped the original photo and altered the saturation.

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